This month we discuss Acne Awareness Month, food-borne illnesses, and the importance of fruits and vegetables.

September is Acne Awareness Month

Many dismiss acne as a common, treatable skin condition. However, research has shown that acne can lead to adverse emotional effects and self-esteem concerns. To help shed some light on acne and provide management strategies, Health Canada has designated September as Acne Awareness Month.

Acne, which affects 90 per cent of teens and a substantial number of adults, begins when glands connected to hair follicles in skin produce an oily substance. Then, when dead skin cells clog the inner lining of the hair follicle, the oil cannot reach the skin’s surface and a bacterium grows, causing inflammation.

A variety of factors cause acne, including changing hormone levels, medications and cosmetics. While acne can impact teens and adults alike, there are a variety of skin care techniques that can help reduce and prevent inflammation:

  • Wash your skin with a mild cleanser in the morning and evening.
  • Regularly shampoo your hair to remove excess grease from around your face.
  • Avoid squeezing and picking blemishes. This will cause more bacteria to move from your hands onto your face and aggravate your skin.

Acne treatments include over-the-counter and prescription options. To treat mild acne, doctors recommend using a topical cream or cleanser containing salicylic acid or benzoyl peroxide. For moderate to severe acne, doctors may prescribe antibiotics and a topical medication.

 

 

Beware of Food-borne Illnesses

Food-borne illness, also referred to as food poisoning, occurs when an individual gets sick from eating food that has been contaminated with harmful microorganisms. Each year, more than 4 million Canadians suffer from food poisoning, experiencing stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and fevers.

Common causes of food-related illnesses include, but are not limited to, botulism, campylobacter, cronobacter, E. coli, norovirus and salmonella.

To avoid contracting a foodborne illness, prepare your food safely and review food-handling materials from Health Canada. If an outbreak is reported or a recall is issued, throw the affected food product away immediately.

Fruits and Veggies: Are You Getting Enough?

If you’re like the majority of Canadians, you’re most likely not eating enough fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables contain essential vitamins, minerals, fibre and other naturally occurring substances that may help prevent chronic diseases. In fact, a healthy diet rich in a variety of vegetables and fruit may help reduce the risk of some types of cancer.

In general, health officials recommend having at least one vegetable or fruit at every meal. Specifically, Health Canada recommends the following:

  1. Eat at least one dark green and one orange vegetable each day. Dark green vegetables can include broccoli, romaine lettuce and spinach. Orange vegetables can include carrots, sweet potatoes and winter squash.
  2. Choose vegetables and fruit prepared with little or no added fat, sugar or salt.
  3. Enjoy vegetables steamed, baked or stir-fried instead of deep-fried.
  4. Have vegetables and fruit more often than juice.

Recipe of the Month – Apple Berry Crisp

Filling

  • 4 apples (about 600 g or 1 ¼ lb), cored and chopped
  • 500 mL (2 cups) frozen or fresh blueberries
  • 45 mL (3 tbsp) packed brown sugar
  • 30 mL (2 tbsp) all-purpose flour
  • 5 mL (1 tsp) vanilla

Topping

  • 250 mL (1 cup) large flake oats
  • 125 mL (½ cup) all-purpose flour
  • 75 mL (⅓ cup) wheat bran
  • 30 mL (2 tbsp) packed brown sugar
  • 2 mL (½ tsp) ground cinnamon
  • 45 mL (3 tbsp) soft non-hydrogenated margarine, melted

PREPARATIONS

  1. In a large bowl, combine apples, blueberries, sugar, flour and vanilla until coated. Spread into a 20-cm (8-inch) square baking dish.
  2. For the topping, combine oats, flour, wheat bran, sugar and cinnamon in a separate bowl. Drizzle with melted margarine and, using a fork, toss to coat oat mixture. Sprinkle over top of fruit mixture.
  3. Bake in preheated 180 C (350 F) oven for about 50 minutes or until apples are tender and top is golden. Let cool slightly before serving.

Makes: 8 servings

Nutritional Information (per serving)

Total Calories 238
Total Fat 6 g
Protein 4 g
Carbohydrates 45 g
Dietary Fibre 5 g
Saturated Fat 1 g
Sodium 47 mg
Total Sugars 22 g

Source: Government of Canada


For more health and wellness information connect with a Benefit Consultant at 1-800-661-1518 or simply fill out the contact form below.

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