Don’t Fall Into This New Year’s Resolution Trap

One of the most common New Year’s resolutions is to lose weight. Unfortunately, many people look to fad diets and weight loss products in hopes of achieving their goals quickly. While fad diets may prove effective initially, research shows that many people don’t find long-term success with these types of diets.

Lasting Lifestyle Changes vs. Quick Fixes

Instead of setting a goal to lose weight quickly in the new year, it can be more effective to set goals that lead to a healthier lifestyle overall. Common lifestyle New Year’s resolutions include:

  • Exercise regularly—Aim to get at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity a week, and to do strength-training exercises of major muscle groups at least twice a week.
  • Maintain a well-balanced, healthy diet—Try to eat a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, protein-rich foods and healthy fats. Make it a goal to incorporate more fruits and vegetables into your diet.
  • Increase the amount of sleep you get—One of the best ways to become healthier is to get plenty of sleep. Experts recommend you aim for at least seven hours of sleep per night.

Set Yourself Up for Success

According to an Ipsos survey, 80 per cent of Canadians fail to keep their New Year’s resolutions, citing lack of willpower, motivation or drive. That’s why it’s so important to set yourself up for success when you’re choosing a resolution.

Regardless of what you choose as your New Year’s resolution, make sure it is a “SMART” goal—one that is specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely—to increase the odds that you will stick to it.



It’s National Alzheimer’s Awareness Month

January is Alzheimer’s Awareness Month in Canada, which seeks to raise awareness about Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, and reduce the stigma surrounding them. Dementia can describe many different forms of brain disorders, some which are treatable and even curable, and others that are as of yet irreversible. Dementia affects over 400,000 Canadians ages 65 and older, costing over $10 billion in out-of-pocket health care costs every year.

Common symptoms of dementia include loss of memory, changes in judgment and reasoning, difficulty performing familiar tasks, problems with language, and changes in mood and behaviour. These symptoms may seem minor at first but worsen over time, eventually becoming fatal. While dementia is not a normal part of aging, age is the biggest risk factor.

If you or someone you know are over 60 years of age and experience any of the above symptoms, consult a physician as soon as possible.


This Superfood May Help Prevent Diabetes

According to a four-year study, consuming legumes (e.g., beans, lentils and peas) may help you prevent diabetes. The study tracked the health of over 3,300 patients who were at-risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, and found that those who consumed the most legumes were 35 per cent less likely to develop diabetes.

The weekly legume serving average varied between 3.35 servings and less than half a serving. The study found that those who ate just one serving per week were 33 per cent less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those who consumed less than one serving per week.

In addition to helping prevent Type 2 diabetes, legumes can help protect heart and brain health, promote a healthy weight and reduce the risk of cancer. For more information, contact your doctor.


Recipe of the Month – Three Sisters’ Soup

Makes: 8 servings

Ingredients
10 ml canola oil
1 medium onion, diced
4 carrots, chopped
4 garlic cloves, minced
4 celery stalks, chopped
2 L no-salt-added vegetable broth
1 butternut squash, cubed
375 ml corn kernels, frozen
2 cans (2 x 540 ml) no-salt-added kidney beans, drained and rinsed
10 ml dried thyme (or 60 mL fresh)
5 ml pepper

Preparations

  • Heat oil in a large saucepan. Add onions and saute over medium heat, stirring often until golden, about 2 minutes.
  • Add carrot, garlic and celery and saute for another 8 minutes, or until softened.
  • Add vegetable broth and bring to a boil.
  • Turn down heat and add cubed squash. Simmer, covered, for 8 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Add beans, corn, thyme and pepper. Stir and simmer another few minutes, until squash is soft when tested with a fork.

Source: Government of Canada


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