Commercial Insurance

The Importance of Reporting Near Misses

The Importance of Reporting Near Misses

The Importance of Reporting Near Misses Near misses in the workplace are cases where an injury, accident, illness or other damage had the potential to occur, but didn’t. Examples of these occurrences include, but are not limited to, the following: Employees forgetting to wear the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) Employees ignoring procedures or work practices A slip or fall that doesn’t result in an injury Tools or other items dropping from height without striking a worker Nearly striking pipes or power lines during drilling procedures When near misses like the ones listed above occur, reporting them to your employer can go a long way in preventing future incidents. Despite this fact, near misses are often dismissed as lucky breaks and go unaddressed. As an employee, it’s your job to help bring serious incidents—near misses or otherwise—to the attention of…read more →

Materials And Waste Management: Prevention Pays

Each year around 1,000 trips or slips on construction sites result in fractured bones or dislocated joints, often leading to permanent disability, harming workplace morale, reducing productivity, and raising insurance premiums. Many of these accidents are due to negligence in dealing with building materials or waste. Safe site operation requires co-ordination between the client, contractor(s), and suppliers. Before beginning a project, agree with the client on arrangements for handling materials and waste. Larger projects should include this agreement in the construction phase plan. To reduce the risk of mishaps in storing materials, experts recommend that you: designate storage areas for materials, waste, and flammable or hazardous substances don’t allow storage to ‘spread’ on walkways or store materials where they might obstruct access or interfere with emergency escape routes store flammable materials separately and protect them from accidental ignition install guard…read more →

Why You Need Construction Liability

No matter how much care you take to keep job sites safe and finish projects according to specifications, accidents happen. Consider these scenarios: an improperly installed kitchen cabinet shelf in a home you built collapses, injuring the owner one of your employees posts a blog accusing a competitor of shoddy workmanship a visitor to your worksite trips over an air hose, falls, and fractures her leg To protect your business against the financial threat of costly litigation from such all-too-common mishaps, you need construction liability insurance. This coverage will pay costs and legal expenses, up to the amount of the policy, for something your business did, or failed to do, that damages a third party, related to 1) your products or services (products and completes operations); 2) allegations of slander (personal and advertising injury); or 2) injury on your premises…read more →

Business Crime Control 101

Crime, from burglary and shoplifting to fraud and embezzlement, plays a role in up to 30% of business failures. To help protect your company (and keep your insurance costs under control), use this checklist: Employees: Do background checks on all applicants Train employees on safe opening and closing procedures Instruct them on what to do in case of robbery, make it clear that they should never endanger themselves by trying to protect money, property, or other valuable items. Money: Keep the amount of onsite cash to a minimum. Make bank deposits daily and vary your time and routes to and from the bank Skim cash drawers throughout the day to ensure that large amounts of cash are not kept in the registers Check cash register receipts against your deposits daily to reduce the threat of employee dishonesty Immediately mark any…read more →

Motivate the Demotivated

Employer after employer is faced with hiring low wage earners who are seldom motivated toward high performance. Except for workplace newbies, most low wage earners are there precisely because of their lack of motivation, creating a classic Catch-22 for employers. If it’s true, as the saying goes, that “I’d rather have ignorance on fire than knowledge on ice,” how can you turn up the burners on low wage earners without increasing turnover? Here are three suggestions: Pay them a bit more. There’s no better example than the In-N-Out hamburger chain located throughout the Southwest. They attract the best in terms of low-wage talent largely by advertising that they pay at least a dollar per hour more than their competitors. Because low wage earners are motivated by survival, security, and the need to belong (in that order) the extra pay makes…read more →

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